Categories
Recipes

Banana and Walnut Loaf

Contents

  1. Recipe
  2. Ingredients
  3. Method
  4. Sarah’s 5 top tips for the perfect banana and walnut loaf

Recipe

An image showing the ingredients and method for making banana and walnut loaf. On the Left hand side the Ingredients are listed and on the Right is the method. The text from this image is written below in the body of text. The background is blue with baking ingredients shown down the far left side: milk in a ramakin, eggs, flour on a tablespoon, butter on a knife, brown sugar on a teaspoon.
Social media image for banana and walnut loaf recipe. Text is written below.

Ingredients

  • 100g softened butter, plus a little for greasing
  • 140g caster sugar
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 225g plain flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 4 very ripe bananas
  • 85g chopped walnuts
  • 50ml milk

Method

Step 1
  • Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4
  • Grease a 2lb loaf tin with some butter and line the base with greaseproof paper, then grease this as well.
Step 2

In a large bowl, mix together the butter, sugar and egg
Then slowly mix in flour and baking powder.
Peel, the mash the bananas, in a separate bowl.
Now mix everything together including the nuts.

Step 3

Pour your mixture into the tin
Bake for 1 hour or until a skewer comes out clean.
Allow cake to cool on a wire rack before removing from the loaf tin
The loaf can now be wrapped in cling film and kept for up to 2 days.

Sarah’s 5 top tips for the perfect banana and walnut loaf

An image showing the Sarah's top tips for the perfect banana and walnut loaf. 5 tips are listed.. The text from these tips is written below in the body of text. The background is blue with baking ingredients shown down the far left side: milk in a ramakin, eggs, flour on a tablespoon, butter on a knife, brown sugar on a teaspoon.
Social media image for Sarah’s 5 top tips for the perfect banana and walnut loaf. Text is written below.
  • Tip 1: I like to use almost full black bananas for my loaf, I find these taste the best and are easier to mash into a puree.
  • Tip 2: I like adding larger pieces of walnut to my mix to add some extra crunch and texture.
  • Tip 3: If you don’t have greaseproof paper don’t worry, I sometimes grease my tin with a little butter then add a light coat of flour on top. This helps it come out of the tin nicely.
  • Tip 4: I make sure my egg is beaten well until little bubbles are formed. This helps the cake be lighter and fluffier.
  • Tip 5: I always sieve my flour when I added e as this helps stop lumps and also helps make a lighter and fluffier loaf. When it comes to mixing in the flour I mix it gently, also known as folding.

Let us know what you think it you make this recipe! Enjoy!

Categories
Celebrities Inspirational People Mental Health SEND

From genies to presidents: Robin Williams

“I want to help people be less afraid”

A wish written by Robin Williams in his Twelve Step book

Actor and comedian Robin McLaurin Williams was born on July 21, 1951, in Chicago, Illinois. When he was 16, his father retired from his job as a car salesman, and the family moved to the San Francisco area. Robin attended Claremont Men’s College and College of Marin before getting a scholarship to study at the Juilliard School in New York City. There he befriended and became roommates with fellow actor Christopher Reeve. Robin later tried stand-up comedy in San Francisco and Los Angeles, developing a successful act. Williams eventually moved back to California, where he began appearing in comedy clubs in the early 1970s.

By the mid-1970s Williams was guest starring on several television shows. After guest appearances as the alien Mork on Happy Days, he was given his own show, Mork & Mindy (1978–82). The series offered Robin the opportunity to transfer the passion of his stand-up performances to the small screen and provided an outlet for his many comedic talents. Mork & Mindy proved a big success and was key in launching Williams’s film career.

A string of successful film roles for Williams followed over the years, showcasing his stellar comedic talents as well as his ability to take on serious work. His first major role came with Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), in which he portrayed the irreverent military disc jockey Adrian Cronauer. The role earned Williams his first Academy Award nomination.

In the early 1990s he lent his talents to a number of successful family-oriented films, including Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), in which he played a divorced man who impersonates a female nanny in order to be close to his children, and the animated feature Aladdin (1992), in which he voiced the forever famous genie. He later portrayed Teddy Roosevelt in the comedy Night at the Museum (2006) and two sequels (2009, 2014). He provided voices for the animated films Happy Feet (2006) and Happy Feet Two (2011). Williams was side-lined with heart problems in early 2009, but he returned to work shortly thereafter.

A composite image of three different pictures of Robin Williams in a row. On the left, Robin Williams is shown in his Mrs. Doubtfire costume: an old white lady with grey hair pulled up into a bun, wearing large circular glasses, a white shirt and blue and white cardigan. She is holding a feather duster. In the middle Image, Robin Williams is shown back to back with his character from the animated movie Aladdin. The genie is blue, with pointy ears and a thin black beard and think black eye brows. On the right, Robin Williams is shown in his costume from Night at the Museum. He is dressed in a United States Veterans uniform, with a moustache and small circular glasses.

On August 11, 2014, the 63-year-old comedian had passed away in his California home. His publicist released this statement:

“Robin Williams passed away this morning. He has been battling severe depression of late. This is a tragic and sudden loss. The family respectfully asks for their privacy as they grieve during this very difficult time.”

In a statement issued by his wife on August 13, she had said that her Robin had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease which he had not disclosed publicly. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that progresses over time, affecting movement and speech. She also confirmed that the actor was battling depression and anxiety. Robin’s wife statement also expressed gratitude for the outpouring of support following her husband’s suicide and touched on the legacy he left behind:

“Since his passing, all of us who loved Robin have found some solace in the tremendous outpouring of affection and admiration for him from the millions of people whose lives he touched. His greatest legacy, besides his three children, is the joy and happiness he offered to others, particularly to those fighting personal battles.”

In November 2014, reports surfaced that prior to his death Williams was also suffering from Lewy body dementia, a type of progressive dementia often found in people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. In December of that year, Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb, the final film in the series, was released in which Williams reprised his role as Roosevelt.

Years after his death, Williams’s show business career and final days remained a captivating subject for fans. Dave Itzkoff’s Robin became a best-seller following its May 2018 publication, and two months later, HBO offered a character study of the comedian via footage of stand-up clips and interviews with family and friends in Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind.

Robin Williams looking up he's wearing a black t-shirt and has a gold chain necklace around his neck. The background is black. Quote reads; No matter what people tell you, words and ideas can change the world. -Robin Williams

If you, or someone you know, is struggling with mental health difficulties and/or suicidal intent or ideation, the following organisations may be able to help:

Categories
Education SEND Surveys

Public Feedback on Surrey’s Alternative Provision

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Additional Mental Health Support
  3. Additional Support for those with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities:
  4. Adaptable Teaching Styles & Understanding Needs
  5. 1:1 Support
  6. Local Alternative Provision

Introduction

Alternative Provision is education outside school for pupils who don’t attend mainstream school for reasons which might include being excluded, behaviour concerns, mental health or illness. Examples of Alternative Provision include Pupil Referral Units, the Alternative Learning Programme (ALP), Short Stay Schools and Access to Education (A2E).

Surrey County Council are redesigning the strategy for Alternative Provision and the User Voice and Participation Team created two online surveys to get the views of children, young people, parents and carers. The surveys were open from 23rd October 2020 – 17th November 2020. We received responses from 65 children and young people and 78 parents and carers. Below are the main things that respondents told us they would like to see in Alternative Provision:

Additional Mental Health Support

38% of children and young people said that mental health was one of the main barriers that affected them staying in mainstream education. Parents and carers also expressed that mental health was a significant issue that they felt needed attention. Therefore, more mental health support is needed to help children and young people to remain in education. Children and young people need to be able to access support easily and in a timely manner to ensure that their mental health issues are addressed quickly, and their education is not affected.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘I could benefit by having someone to talk to whenever I’m feeling down or nervous, someone who could help me when I’m stressed or struggling with work etc’ Young person

‘Someone in the room knowing about my mental health and actually taking the time to help me, without cutting corners’ Young person

‘Support from a doctor or mental health professional as needed’ Parent/Carer.

Additional Support for those with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

44% of parents and carers said that undiagnosed special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) or lack of support for those with SEND was the main barrier to their child or young person remaining in mainstream education. A number of children and young people also said that they felt their additional needs were a barrier to remaining in education. We therefore need to ensure that children and young people with SEND are diagnosed in a timely manner and that enough support is put in place to help them manage their education. Many parents and carers recognise that the cause of this is often due to a lack of funding for schools which is an area that they feel needs to be addressed.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘People to help with understanding additional need even if people can’t see them’ Young person.

‘Struggle on daily basis – waiting assessment for ADHD – find classrooms very distracting’ Young person.

‘Teachers need more training and support in managing children with additional needs who perhaps do not have an EHCP in place’ Parent/Carer.

Adaptable Teaching Styles & Understanding Needs

A number of respondents were frustrated at the ‘one size fits all’ approach that they feel is often in place in education. It is important that teaching staff have a good understanding of their students’ individual needs and can adapt their teaching styles so that nobody gets left behind.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘Teachers educated in different styles of pupil engagement and schools being adaptable to support this’ Parent/Carer.

‘Tasks explained in different ways if the first way is too difficult to understand’ Young person.

1:1 Support

When children and young people feel like they are falling behind in education, it can cause them a lot of anxiety and, due to class sizes, it is not always possible for the teacher to spend as much time as they need with individual pupils. Respondents from both surveys said that it would be beneficial to have more 1:1 support in place to help children and young people remain in education.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘More 1 to 1 support earlier in schooling to prevent phobia from developing and placement to fail’ Young person.

‘Time out of the classroom and more 1-1 support’ Parent/Carer

Local Alternative Provision

Although some children and young people said that they would be happy to attend alternative provision that was in a different town, more than half said that travelling a long way was likely to affect their attendance. Similarly, over 70% of parents and carers felt that travelling a long distance would impact on their child or young person’s ability to attend e.g. due to anxiety, tiredness etc. We therefore need to ensure that we have enough Alternative Provision available across Surrey to avoid young people having to make unreasonable journeys.

This is what some of the respondents had to say:

‘The fact that I had to wake up every day and travel 2 hours a day to school and back was exhausting’ Young person.

‘This has happened to my son as he was travelling 45 minutes each way in a taxi. He is now unable to attend due to fatigue and anxiety and a reduced timetable is not an option due to the travelling time’ Parent/Carer.

Other things that respondents said they would like to see from Alternative Provision included:

  • Outdoor space‘‘I need space to run and climb when I feel stressed’ Young person.
  • Small classes and separate rooms that students can go to if they need some time out‘A comfortable setting, not just a classroom with different areas if I needed to be alone rather than surrounded by lots of people’ Young person.
  • Nice buildings‘They don’t have a great space to work from. They are teaching in rundown premises which need updating and, compared to local schools, that doesn’t seem fair’ Parent/Carer.
  • Kind teachers ‘Good fun teachers that are more of a friend but can be professional when they need to be’ Young person.

If you would like to read more about the results of the surveys, please see the full reports below:

Categories
Celebrities chronic illness Disability History Month Inspirational People SEND

Lady Gaga and her Fibromyalgia

Who is Lady Gaga?

Lady Gaga is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, actress, and businesswoman. As well as publishing multiple hit singles and albums, she also owns her own cosmetics brand (Haus Cosmetics) and founded a non-profit organization, the Born This Way Foundation. It focuses on the empowerment of young people, improving mental health, and preventing bullying.

She also has mental health difficulties, and fibromyalgia.

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain condition. It usually presents with widespread pain and chronic fatigue, but you can experience a wide variety of symptoms. Something a lot of people with fibromyalgia experience is cognitive and memory problems, which is referred to as ‘fibro fog’. At this time, there is no cure for fibromyalgia, although some medications and other therapies can help improve its symptoms.

Lady Gaga’s experience

She shows how this affects her in her documentary, Gaga: Five Foot Two. She has needed to cancel tours and shows because of her health conditions. Shown below is an image of her receiving medical treatment for her chronic pain. It is taken from her documentary.

Lady Gaga is shown lying under a plastic sheet, wincing in pain. There are medically gloved hands - one holding an ultrasound machine and two administering a needle into her shoulder.

She speaks about her chronic pain a lot, to raise awareness about it. She manages her condition well, and something that contributes greatly to this is her access to the latest procedures and top-quality doctors. Even with this, she still experiences debilitating pain.

Lady Gag is shown from the hips up on stage. She is wearing all black. Her outfit is sleeveless so you can see her tattoos. One hand is holding a microphone to her moth and the other is outstretched.

Lady Gaga talks about her chronic pain:

“I get so irritated with people who don’t believe fibromyalgia is real. For me, and I think for many others, it’s really a cyclone of anxiety, depression, PTSD, trauma, and panic disorder, all of which sends the nervous system into overdrive, and then you have nerve pain as a result.”

“People need to be more compassionate. Chronic pain is no joke. And it’s every day waking up not knowing how you’re going to feel.”

“You will hear the pain in my voice and in some of the lyrics, but it always celebrates.”

“I’m a fighter. I use the word ‘suffer’ not only because trauma and chronic pain have changed my life, but because they are keeping me from living a normal life.”

“I hope that people watching it that do struggle with chronic pain know that they are not alone. […] see me dance and sing, to know I struggle with things like them and that I work through it and that it can be done.”

Categories
Bullying Care Education Mental Health Personal Story

The Importance of Alternative Learning Provision

This personal account was written by a young person and they have shared it with the User Voice and Participation Team. This young person wishes to remain anonymous.

“Mainstream education was difficult for me because of the bullying I received from other students. Before other students found out my mum had a disability I was like any other person in the school, I had lots of friends in and out of school, but this all changed overnight. There was a boy in my class who was known for bullying students, I really don’t know how he found out about my mum’s disability but he started to walk past me and pretend he was on crutches, other people then started to do the same. 

I would go into school, have form time and then walk to lesson, every time there would be a group of young people pretending to walk on crutches and laughing to each other. This then progressed to them finding out my father had died, they then started to make fun of this. I tried to deal with it by taking it as a joke, hoping they would stop, but I could not take anymore by Christmas. I spoke to my head of house about it and I felt it was not taken seriously. This response had a detrimental effect on my mental health, and I started to make up excuses not to go to school, the school would send work home for me to complete, which I was doing (Year 8).

At the beginning of Year 9 my mum and myself were asked to go to a meeting at school, we were told the main instigator of the bullying had moved to the other side of the year and the rest of his group had been expelled. I agreed to go back to school however because of my trauma, I now found it hard to be around lots of people, so I was put in isolation. This was the worst thing that could have happened because the bully then ended up in the same classroom as me.

My anxiety then went through the roof and I then refused to return to school. I felt the school were not very understanding of my issues and threatened to arrest my mum for letting me stay home.

The school did not send any work back home to me as I was not de-rolled and my mum was still being threatened. This added a lot of anxiety to what I was already feeling, in Year 9 I still managed to get out over the weekend, but this stopped quickly by Christmas as I was beaten up by the bully and his group of friends in town.

I then stopped going out for a year and a half. I was struggling with my mental health and I was referred to CAMHS.

At the beginning of Year 11 the school contacted my mum and suggested that I went to Access to Education (A2E), I was anxious about this as I had not seen anyone for a number of months.

A2E came over to my house to meet me, I was nervous, but they started a conversation about football and that put me at ease. They explained I would only be with one other person and this gave me the courage to give it a go. They eased me by letting me do the first week’s lessons online. The following week I was picked up by one of the workers and taken to the centre, she kept me calm by talking about football.

A2E supported me in that when I was having a bad day, I could do my lessons online at home and this helped a lot. A2E was more informal than school, I was allowed to call the teachers by their first name which made a difference. They mixed the day up with lessons and then we had a fun activity. There was no PE which I feel could have benefitted me but in general I felt safe and was able to learn without feeling anxious.

A positive experience was when I attended A2E another young person from my school came to the centre and he had the same experience with the same people. We supported one another through our time there and it confirmed my experience at school was unmanageable, it also began to help with my recovery.

If I could add anything to A2E I would want to include physical activities where possible. What made A2E the ideal alternative provision was the attitude of the workers involved. Their approach made A2E the best provision for me at the time, I cannot think of anything else other than to include PE, that could have made my experience better. Overall, I think there should be more alternative learning provisions like A2E for young people as there are a lot of young people struggling with mainstream education.”

Categories
Autism Celebrities Inspirational People SEND

Satoshi Tajiri: how autism inspired Pokémon

Satoshi Tajiri is Japanese and born August 28, 1965. He is the creator of Pokémon which became a huge global success and he has Autism.

When Satoshi Tajiri was a young boy, he loved to explore the outdoors and was really interested with insects. He loved to collect insects, looking for them in ponds, fields and forests, constantly trying to find new insects and coming up with different ways to catch insects such as beetles. He had such an interest in collecting and studying insects that he earned the nickname “Dr. Bug” among other children and friends.

In the late 1970s, the fields and ponds that Tajiri loved as a child were used to build apartment buildings and shopping centres. At this time, Tajiri’s passion for insects moved to video games and arcades. Because of his new obsession captured so much of his time and attention that he actually cut classes and wound up flunking high school.

His parents were concerned; they actually didn’t understand his obsession with games and thought he was a delinquent throwing his life away. He eventually took make-up classes and got his high school diploma, but he only did a two year stint at the Tokyo National College of Technology studying computer science and electronics.

In the early 1990s was when Tajiri first saw two children playing together with Game Boys using the Game Link Cable. He imagined insects crawling along the cable between the two systems. As he thought about the uses of the Game Link Cable, his idea for Pokémon grew, as he wanted to give modern children the chance to hunt for creatures as he did as a child.

He pitched the idea for Pokémon to Nintendo, and although they didn’t fully understand the concept of the game, he was given some initial funding anyway. Tajiri spent the next six years working on Pokémon. Shigeru Miyamoto, the man behind Mario, The Legend of Zelda, Pikmin, and Donkey Kong, was assigned to help in the development of the initial versions of Pocket Monsters, Red and Green. While working on the game Tajiri came to admire Miyamoto as a mentor. As a tribute to Miyamoto and Tajiri, the main character of the original games and his rival have “Satoshi” and “Shigeru” among their default names.

After six years of development, Pokémon Red and Green Versions were completed. Although the Game Boy’s hardware was becoming outdated, the game still grew steadily in popularity because younger children could not afford brand-new console games so they turned to the inexpensive Game Boy games.

The success of Pokémon led to various manga adaptations, an anime, and more Pokémon games and spinoff games.

Satoshi has gone on record saying that he wanted the games to give children the same joy as he had during his bug collecting.  People with autism tend to take up collecting as a hobby, so Satoshi gave them and everyone else a gift that only he could create: a whole new thing to collect.

While Mr. Satoshi Tajiri has confirmed that he has ASD, he does not publicly talk about his condition and would rather remain away from the spotlight, focusing on work and on pursuing his own interests above fame and fortune.

Categories
Disability History Month Education SEND

The History of Mobility Aids

Introduction

The evolution of personal mobility aids is very linked into the way society viewed, or was aware of, people with reduced mobility. If we look back to the Middle Ages, for example, society didn’t feel responsible for people with reduced mobility or other disabilities. Many disabled people lived as outcasts in a society full of superstition.

One of the very first wheelchairs we know about is from the 5th century B.C. and is this blog’s featured image.

Depicted in this ‘wheelchair’ is Confucius, a famous ancient philosopher and teacher. It was a very rudimentary version of a wheelchair, but was a wheeled device used with the intent of helping people with reduced mobility, so is presented here as an example.

Walking sticks have probably been used for thousands of years. Ultimately, in a rudimentary form you can just pick up a branch and use it to help you walk. However, the time at which these were used more as mobility aids rather than like hiking sticks is unclear.

1500s-1900s

Mobility aids started to develop much more around the 15th century.

The oldest known use of a walking frame in England is depicted on a piece of clothing from the 14th century. It depicts either the young Virgin Mary, or Jesus, learning to walk using a three-wheeled frame.

In the 15th century, Queen Elizabeth of Spain set up a hospital where soldiers were provided with prosthetic and therapeutic devices, and they would also receive a pension. During her time as queen, institutions for children, blind, deaf and disabled people were also created. Her husband, King Felipe II, used a wheelchair which was quite elaborate for its time. It had arm and foot rests.

A drawing from the 15th Century of a man in a whellchair. The chair is large with small wheels. The person is slightly reclined due to the design of the chair

But it was only in about the 18th century that wheelchairs were invented that look like the ones we use today. This wheelchair had two large front wheels and a small rear wheel one on each side.

A drawing of an 18th century wheelchair. The two front wheels are large, with two back small wheels. There is a large handle at the back for the person pushing the wheelchair to use. There is also a lap tray and foot rest

In the 19th century, wheelchairs were made mostly out of wood and wicker. They became popular in the USA, especially amongst veterans of the Civil War (and later on, WWI).

A drawing of an 19th century wooden wheelchair. The two front wheels are large, with one small back wheel. There is also a foot rest

1900-1960s

The first folding wheelchair was designed by a pair of engineers in 1932, after one of them had an accident with a landmine during WWI.

Though the first electrically driven wheelchair was created in 1924, the first electric wheelchair was invented after WWII. Lots more soldiers who suffered spinal cord damage in the war had survived, due to advances in technology and medical knowledge, which meant there was a greater demand for wheelchairs.

There had been many improvements to manual wheelchairs, but if you were quadriplegic, you were unable to use a manual wheelchair without the assistance of another person. So, thanks to support from the Canadian Government and other scientists, George Klein invented the electric wheelchair. This enabled people who did not have the energy or mobility to use a self-propelled wheelchair to have more independence.

1960s-1980s

In the 60s and 70s, mobility scooters and rollators appeared, and walkers similar to the ones used today came into development.

Mobility scooters

These came about for the first time in the late 60s. They were quite successful, and seen as alternatives to the electric wheelchair. They were designed for people who could walk, but who couldn’t travel long distances on foot because of problems in their knees or arthritis.

A photograph of a mobility scooter from the late 60s. The scooter has a minimal design that is mostly metal. There is a brown plastic, cushion chair with arm rests on top of a metal plate. In front there are handlebars for steering. It has three small wheels, two at the back and one at the front.

Walkers

A walker is the most stable walking aid. It is made of a frame which you place in front of you and hold onto during movement. These have been used for a long time, but were usually wheeled. In the 70s, walkers more like the Zimmer frames we see used today were created. They were usually made of metal.

A technical drawing of a mobility aid walker. It shows a metal frame with 3 sides and handles at the top in two main designs and from different angles.

Rollators

A rollator is a type of walker that has three or four wheels on it. It also usually has a built in seat, which allows the person using it to stop and rest when needed. Rollators often have a shopping basket attached.

It was invented by Swedish inventor and polio survivor, Aina Wifalk, in 1978.

A picture of a blue framed rollator with a black basket. It has four white wheels and a seat above and behind the basket.
Categories
Bullying Education Mental Health SEND Social

How Language Impacts Lives: Stigma and Ableism

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. What is stigma?
  3. Bullying
  4. Our role in ableism
  5. Self-description
  6. The power of participation

Introduction

Recently I have been facilitating some of the virtual group meetings with the SYAS members. As this week is anti-bullying week, the young people have been sharing their experiences with stigma and bullying as well as discussing ableist language and how they self-describe.

Overall, it is felt and experienced that stigma and bullying are still prevalent. SYAS are telling us that we all need to be doing more to increase the visibility of additional needs and disabilities, as well as mental health (find out more on comorbid mental health and SEND needs), throughout society.

One of the repeating themes of discussion has been the importance of language in their experience as young people with additional needs and disabilities; how the language used to define and describe them has a direct impact on their lives.

What is stigma?

In this context, stigma is used to refer to the negative stereotypes and associations that society or individuals hold against a group of people. This results in prejudice and discrimination against the stigmatised group at social and/or structural levels.

In some cases, individuals from the stigmatised group can internalise this stigma, which affects how they view themselves and the expectations they have of themselves. This is known as self-stigma. An example of this which I have heard frequently and struggled with myself can be seen with dyslexia.

Due to the stigma around dyslexia, unfortunately you often hear people with dyslexia calling themselves words like stupid, or setting low expectations for themselves. They may be used to similar treatment from the people around them since diagnosis or had heard of the stigma before realising they were dyslexic themselves. Our member Ryan touches on this in his blog on dyslexia.

Stigma can lead to people being stereotyped, isolated and discriminated against. Ultimately this can have a variety of impacts on the targeted individuals, including avoiding diagnosis or treatment, and becoming the target of bullying.

Bullying

People “make fun of disability in my school.”

There are many different types of bullying and many reasons why someone may be bullied. When it comes to young people being bullied for their additional needs and disabilities, SYAS felt like this was predominantly because of two factors: being different and the stigma surrounding their additional needs and disabilities.

“If you are different you are going to get bullied”

There is “not much understanding about how to stop [bullying and stigma]… people are still ignorant”

Stigma-based bullying is especially complex because it not only requires localised anti-bullying action but also a society-level approach to reduce stereotypes and prejudice on a larger scale.

An important part of tackling bullying aimed at people with additional needs and disabilities will be to address the widespread ableism and lack of disability awareness in our society.

“I don’t want to be made out to be ‘special’ because I have needs.”

Our role in ableism

What I can do and achieve is “underestimated by the college and my peers” because of my diagnosis

An ableist society is defined by its assumption that people without additional needs or disabilities are the norm. The way that society, physical structures and policies are designed is inherently exclusionary and inaccessible. This results in the limitation and undervaluing of people with additional needs and/or disabilities.

The way ableism presents is complex and can impact people on a variety of fronts. This ranges from the texture of a pavement surface or the lack of braille on building signs, all the way up to public attitudes and the very language used to define us.

“[Ableist] language is used on all official forms from the government. Ableist language is used as the basis of everything.”

People who do not experience and/or are not knowledgeable about additional needs and disabilities may find it hard to see how others can be disadvantaged by design or realise the existence or extent of stigma.

“Sometimes it’s not the words themselves, but the attitudes … You can use the word disabled in a derogatory fashion.”

I would like to recommend that if you are ever in doubt about the language you are or will be using, please ask the people described or impacted by that language.

Self-description

The way in which words are used to describe people shows how society sees them and acts as a perceived measure of both their worth and overall contribution to that society. How we define ourselves reveals our internal existence and true lived experience.

“Everyone around me assumes that I am not able to do things. Whereas I can’t do some things some days, but I can other days … They had only read the language on my report and not met me. Then I spoke to them on the phone and they realised their mistake, encouraged me to go to university.”

When public speaker and anti-bullying activist Lizzie Velasquez was 17 years old, she discovered that she had been titled “The World’s Ugliest Women” due to her disability: a rare congenital disease called Marfanoid–progeroid–lipodystrophy syndrome that prevents her from developing body fat.

In this powerful TED Talk she talks about the importance of self-description for everyone and asks: “what defines you?” (closed captions are available for this video).

You can find out more about Lizzie on her Youtube channel.

The power of participation

The User Voice and Participation (UVP) Team believe that the voice of the service user should inform our practice. Our aim is not only to make sure that the voices of young people are heard but also to facilitate participation groups that embody the meaning of participation, as defined by the young people that we work alongside.

This process is ongoing and always will be. Through this process we hope to help young people grow as individuals. We should not just take feedback from young people, but also give back in ways defined by the young people themselves. Examples of this include helping them develop confidence, providing Makaton training or interview skills advice.

“SYAS has helped me build friends but not just in SYAS, outside too, as it has given me confidence.”

SYAS will be changing. Currently our members are working to rename and rebrand the participation group so that it aligns more closely with how they self-describe.

As a group, not only will SYAS be redefining itself, but the young people will also be creating a report of preferred terminology.

“My disability is fluid.”

Due to recognition of the fact that people identify with different words in different ways, SYAS have decided to use a traffic light system to indicate whether words should never be used (red), that some people may be okay with some words (amber) and words that are more widely accepted (green).

“I would rather say I have additional needs than say that I’m disabled.”

“Everyone identifies with the word ‘disability’ differently. Some Deaf and Blind people don’t consider being deaf and blind a disability. But for me I am chronically ill so it doesn’t matter where you put me, I’m still in pain all the time. Some disability you might have a better experience, but with my chronic illness I am not gaining, I am only losing.”

Watch this space for more news on SYAS’s new name and how participation will be changing to be more accessible! In the meantime I will leave you with one last thought from our young people about the language around additional needs and disabilities:

“Honestly a lot of time it’s about asking. It is about how someone self-describes.”

Categories
Celebration Celebrities Dyslexia Inspirational People SEND Work

Jamie Oliver: a chef with dyslexia

Who is Jamie Oliver?

Jamie Oliver is a British celebrity chef. He has his own restaurant chain, has sold more than 14.55 million books, and has a reported net worth of over £240 million. He also has dyslexia!
He struggled a lot at school – he was labelled as ‘special needs’ and was mocked by the other boys for being taken out of classes. He has always struggled with reading. Jamie did not finish reading his first novel until 2013: he was 38 years old.

“I’m not a good reader. I’ve always tried to read a book and given up after the first page.”

However, he does not think that dyslexia is a limitation. In fact, he has found his dyslexia to be a positive thing! 

“being dyslexic or having special needs is not an excuse or reason for you not to prosper.”

What does Jamie Oliver think of Dyslexia?

Here are some positive things that Jamie Oliver has said about his dyslexia:

  • “If I’m in a meeting I just see the problems differently and I obsess about things differently.”
  • “Some bits of work need to be sweated over and cried over and crafted. Because I’m dyslexic, sometimes, when it requires a load of stuff to be done, I just do it. It’s like I’m a massive ten-tonne boulder rolling down the hill.”
  • “I’ve never struggled – my brain works in quite a weird way and I often imagine how it tastes and put concepts together in my head. I can 85% smell it and almost taste it, I’m normally about right. I’ve found my dyslexia to be such a gift in the job.”
  • “I’m humbled and excited that MI5 employ dyslexics specifically. Dyslexics look at problem-solving in a totally different way. This is why dyslexia is a gift, not a problem.”
Jamie Oliver stands giving eye contact to the camera and offering a plate of food forward. Wearing a blue shirt, with his short hair brushed back, Jamie Oliver is seen in what looks like a home kitchen.
Taken from an interview with Jamie Oliver about Dyslexia on the Guardian Website: “those with dyslexia [are] lucky”.

Made by Dyslexia

In 2017, Jamie Olivier was interviewed by the charity ‘Made by Dyslexia’. You can watch this interview over on you tube, or read the transcript, below:

Jamie Oliver can be seen sitting on a stool in mid-conversation. He is wearning blue jeans and a dark blue shirt. His hair is ruffled. The background is a blurred out, large kitchen with big windows.
Screenshot taken from the #MadeByDyslexia interview with Jamie Oliver on You tube

Jamie Oliver #madebydyslexia interview transcript:

I loved school. I really loved school. It was like a glorified youth club. I had nothing to offer at school – I didn’t learn much about myself at school, didn’t feel compelled to excel and put extra effort into any class at school. But I liked hanging out with my mates. I didn’t bunk off, cause I was happy, you know it’s almost like the one hardest ingredient of school is if the kid’s happy, you’ve got all the permissions to do everything else. I was really happy, but nothing else happened and there’s a bit of a weird one as well because when I was at school dyslexia wasn’t really- you were either almost blind or not dyslexic so I was just put in special needs, you know, you’ve got a thick kid, so you know.

But now my nephews kind of get a proper run down. They know so much more about the particular type of help they need, they get the assistance, they don’t necessarily get dragged out of class and put in a blimmin’ room at the top of the school, like a sort of dunce do you know what I mean? So it was a bit of a stigma when I was at school – didn’t bother me, because I was one of the bigger boys, but it I mean- it wasn’t great for self-esteem really.

They [the teachers] all said the same thing you know, lovely boy, you know- polite, respectable, you know I got on with teachers but you know that’s why I love the debate about education. You know who said education is what we say it is? Oh look, a couple of dudes from 500 years ago sort of set up the structure of it, English, Maths, Science, okay okay so if you’re not very good at black and white and sort of traditional academia, you’re thick? Therefore you have no value or?

So for me personally, I’ve always been passionate since leaving school about- well there’s different types of intelligence and everyone has the ability to do brilliant. And you know, school should really be about facilitating kids to find their sort of inner genius and their inner confidence, and help them with life skills, and just being good people whereas actually school is quite rigid.

Everything’s based on measurement and every child is different, every town, every school is different, every part of the country is different – so there’s no way of controlling it. It becomes more about culture than sort of hard measurements and you know- quite a few of- well there were only five people in my special needs class but three of them have done really well. I know people that left school with As As and As, but are really on just above minimum wage.

Personally I think my strength is just a complete obsession to any expression of empowering people and teaching people to cook. Whether that’s a book, the paper its on the photographer we use, sitting next to- you know, fifteen years later, the effort on design and how we lay out a page to try and empower Billy from Bognor to be able to achieve something that’s really affordable, that a king would be happy to eat. Ultimately that is what it comes down to for me. We’ve got a massive problem in this country with under-mentored, under-loved kids that don’t see that you could be good at something very simple, and turn it into a life’s work. That you enjoy, that makes you want to get out of bed with a spark in your eye.

Categories
Mental Health Personal Story SEND

Comorbid Mental Health and SEND Needs

Rowan Foster, one of our SYAS members, shares her knowledge and experience with comorbid mental health and SEND needs.

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Misdiagnosis
  3. The accessibility of treatment
  4. Chronic physical illness and mental health
  5. Lack of services
  6. Conclusion

Introduction

When someone has SEND needs, the way they experience the world and consequently the way they experience mental health can be very different, because their brain is wired completely differently – especially in autism. The challenges faced by someone with SEND, living in a world that is not built for them and often works against them, can lead to mental health issues, and in addition to this many mental health conditions are highly comorbid in people with SEND: for example, a study found that seven out of ten people with autism also have a condition like anxiety, depression, or OCD.

In this blog post, I will discuss some of the key issues that young people with comorbid mental health and SEND needs often face.

Misdiagnosis

The way that mental health difficulties can present in young people with SEND needs is highly varied and complex – and as a result, they can be harder to treat. Until you can acknowledge, understand, and meet the SEND needs that a young person has, it’s tricky to diagnose, understand and treat their mental health difficulties.

Sadly, this isn’t always recognised, and a common result of that is misdiagnosis. Especially when a young person presents with mental health difficulties that need urgent treatment, professionals don’t always have the time or the training to properly take SEND needs into consideration. But the right diagnosis is crucial to the treatment of any mental health difficulty, because a diagnosis helps a professional decide what treatment needs to be given. Giving the wrong treatment is unproductive at best, and seriously harmful at worst.

For example, some of the misdiagnoses that are given to young people with SEND neurodivergent needs are:

It is important to remember that someone with SEND needs can still have these mental health difficulties. However, the interaction between a young person’s SEND and their mental health difficulties means that a diagnosis should be made more carefully. To make sure that the right diagnosis is made, there should be professionals involved who are knowledgeable about SEND and how the young person’s SEND needs affect them must be considered.

A mental health professional I had in the past told me that SEND neurodivergent needs are like a ‘neurological backdrop’ to any mental health problems that show up. It’s like painting on blue vs. red paper. You can put the same paint on the paper, in the same way, but the colour will show up differently.

Professionals can misread the severity of a mental health difficulty because the presentation in a young person with SEND is different to what they expect. With SEND neurodivergent needs in particular, interpreting behaviours and reactions from a purely mental health perspective can lead to misdiagnosis. For example, an autistic meltdown could be misread as a severe mental health crisis, even though it could in fact be relatively easy to manage. If nobody in that young person’s care understands how to do so, they are left untreated.

The accessibility of treatment

Even when a young person is diagnosed correctly, treatments often have different effects on someone with SEND needs. For example, I have heard repeatedly that many young people with autism struggle with CBT, myself included. This is a therapy that the NHS prescribes for a lot of different mental health difficulties. Nonetheless, the very design of CBT means that it is not suitable for everyone. The best therapeutic approaches are individualised and this is especially true for people with neurodivergent needs.

Many therapeutic settings are not accessible to a young person with SEND, through practical accessibility in some cases and sensory difficulties in others. So even if you manage to get the young person treatment that will work for them, you need to make sure this is treatment they can access. What isn’t always understood about accessibility is that a place isn’t fully accessible if it causes undue stress or difficulty to access it. Even if you cannot see any issues with a young person getting to, from and inside a therapeutic setting, that doesn’t mean they aren’t there.

As a person with limited mobility, for example, there are lots of very small things that impact the accessibility of a place – most of which I never would have even thought of when I had full mobility: heavy doors, small steps, the material a path is made from. When the energy and pain it might take for me to get there and back is considered alongside the design of the environment, the recovery time required after an appointment can negatively impact my everyday life.

It is the multitude of small battles that can hurt the most. This is the same for all types of accessibility need. Consider a young person who is anxious about attending a therapeutic setting on top of having to worry about the accessibility of the building they must enter to access support. It is just another stress that they don’t need, and that could exacerbate their existing SEND and/or mental health difficulties.

Imagine that you have been placed somewhere that is supposed to protect you, however it is uncomfortable and possibly painful for you to be there. You are unable to remove yourself from this situation. How do you feel?

Inpatient facilities are often not accessible as they tend to be bright and/or loud spaces with very little privacy: a sensory nightmare. If a young person is there under a section, they cannot leave. Someone in an inpatient facility for their mental health would have been struggling before they arrived. They shouldn’t have to deal with inaccessibility on top of that.

Physical chronic illness/disability and mental health

It is also worth noting that if a young person has physical difficulties like chronic illnesses or disabilities, the relationship between this and comorbid mental health is often not explored in the right way. Young people are often not believed about symptoms like chronic pain – it is assumed that you’re ‘too young’ or exaggerating to get out of doing something. I’ve heard it said before that everything would be better if mental health was treated like physical health, but I’m of the opinion that this isn’t true. Regardless of if your health issues are physical or mental, if someone can’t see it, they often assume it doesn’t exist.

It can be very difficult to access medical treatment or be believed about physical symptoms if you have mental health difficulties, because medical practitioners will often assume that these are the cause. The early symptoms of my physical chronic illnesses were not recognized or addressed by paediatric health services, because they assumed that they were caused by my mental health issues. If they’d been recognized earlier, that could have prevented or at least mitigated the later decline in my physical health.

I have heard of many cases where people are prescribed psychological therapy in the expectation that this will eliminate a lot of their chronic illness symptoms. Therapy can be beneficial for long-term symptom management as it can help you learn to accept and manage your condition however, it is not a cure and shouldn’t be administered as such.

The stress of dealing with physical chronic illness and disability can cause mental health difficulties by itself, especially in cases where pain is involved. It can be so scary for a young person to have to take responsibility for their own body in that way, and it doesn’t help your self esteem when you can’t participate in the same things that your peers do. If your physical illness or disability sets in later in life, then you might also be grieving for the loss of a healthy body.

Young people with physical chronic illnesses and disabilities need empathy and support – and young people need to be believed and listened to.

Lack of services

There is no service or provision for a young person with SEND needs and mental health issues. Unfortunately, this means that nobody knows what to do when a young person needs support for both simultaneously, and nobody knows who is responsible for them. Young people with these more complex needs often find themselves jumping from service to service. The way that the services are built now means that a young person often finds themselves receiving treatment or support from a multitude of teams – none of whom speak to each other. It is usually left up to the young person and their parents or carers to coordinate their own care.

A holistic approach is key to treatment of many mental health conditions, which the current services fail to do. Mental health services do not understand the SEND needs, and the SEND needs either don’t have a service (because almost all SEND services are built for young people with moderate to severe visible + physical disabilities or learning difficulties with lower cognitive functioning) or their service doesn’t fully understand the mental health needs, especially when complex. These services can provide some help, but none of them can fully meet that young person’s needs. The fact that they do not talk to each other compounds the issue. The young person is left with a disorganised, often ineffective, treatment path, and it is difficult for them to know what is happening.

Conclusion

I think we need more integrated and holistic care options to provide for the needs of SEND young people. We face enough discrimination from the world around us. It is disappointing that we sometimes also face this discrimination from the services that are supposed to help us. I believe that we can do better than that. We must.

I hope this post has been a valuable read for you. Maybe you related to parts of it, or maybe you’ve learnt something new. Even more so, I hope that you remember to treat the SEND young people in your life with compassion and respect. Especially if that person is you.


Resources

[1]https://www.autismresearchtrust.org/news/borderline-personality-disorder-or-autism

[2]https://pro.psychcentral.com/aspergers-syndrome-vs-ocd-how-to-avoid-misdiagnosis/

[3]https://www.drakeinstitute.com/adhd-vs-anxiety-whats-the-difference

[4]https://socialanxietyinstitute.org/social-anxiety-and-aspergers-differences

[5]https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/adhd.2005.13.3.9?journalCode=adhd

[6]https://adhdnews.qbtech.com/odd-a-problem-of-misdiagnosis#

[7] https://network.autism.org.uk/good-practice/case-studies/eating-disorder-or-disordered-eating-eating-patterns-autism

Categories
Covid 19 Education University

Staying Safe at University

Last updated: 20th October
By Rowan Foster

Key Messages

Remember – ‘hands, face, space’.

a government advert for keeping safe in the pandemic. Three vertical rectangles are shown in a line. The first is blue with the online of a running tap, it reads: wash hands. The second is yellow with a line drawing of someone wearing a medical mask, it reads: cover face. the third is pink with the outline of two people looking at each other across a distance, it reads: make space. The NHS logo is shown in the top right and the HM Government logo in the top left.
A government advert for keeping safe during the pandemic: wash hands, cover face, make space
  • Wash your hands regularly
  • Wear a face covering, where rules apply
  • Keep a 2m distance
  • Socialise only with your household, or a maximum of 6 people
  • Get a test and self-isolate if you develop symptoms
  • Keep an eye on the local alert level, and make changes based on this
  • Use the NHS Test and Trace app

Be prepared for a different university experience!

Whether you’re a fresher, returning student, or a postgrad, you’re likely to have a few concerns about the upcoming academic year. This year’s going to be different in a lot of ways, especially in terms of student life. We want to remind you that you can still have a fulfilling and positive university experience even under these regulations; but we urge you to be responsible and follow guidance as much as you can. We know it’s not easy, but every person can make a difference and help keep the virus contained. We’ve put together this blog post, detailing the changes you’re likely to see, and the guidance you need to bear in mind – we hope you find it useful.

Categories
Covid 19 Education

Back to college safely in Surrey

If you’re over 16 and due to start or continue further education this academic year, it’s important you can get back to college or training safely. Being back supports your progress towards higher education or employment, but it’s also a more fun way to learn and develop, as you get to be face-to-face with tutors and friends again. Having a routine is important for everyone and being back in college or training gives us a routine that’s good for our wellbeing.

The shielding advice from the Government ended on 1st August which means everyone can go back to college and training, including if they or a member of their household was shielding previously. If you need more advice or guidance on this, then please contact your GP or other relevant health professional.

Staying safe INSIDE college

We’ve learnt more about keeping places of education safer. Colleges have introduced measures to keep their students, staff and their families as safe as possible. These measures are based on Government guidelines and are appropriate to each individual college, its community and environment. Public health risks, and measures that need to be taken to reduce these, will be kept under constant review.

Stay safe OUTSIDE college

If you can, you should walk or cycle to college. As well as keeping public transport less crowded, it’s great for the environment and your health. If you do need to take the bus or train, check for changes to the services and allow plenty of time to get there. Remember that it’s now a legal requirement to wear a face covering on public transport, unless you are exempt, and follow social distancing rules.

You are still expected to keep 2 metres between yourself and anybody who isn’t in your household or support bubble. From the 14th of September, any gathering of more than six people either inside or outside is illegal – unless it meets specific criteria set out by the Government. The controlled college environment in college means different rules apply there, but you must remember to follow the rule outside of college.

We understand this may all be frustrating, but it is so important to maintain this social distancing, as it is designed to keep the infection rate low. If this isn’t followed, then it’s likely stricter measures will have to be put in place as the infection rate rises. To keep everybody safe, follow the latest guidance.

Stay at home if you have symptoms

If you or anyone in your household has symptoms of coronavirus, including a new, continuous cough, high fever or change in sense of taste and smell, that person needs to stay at home, self-isolate for 10 days and follow the guidance at gov.uk/coronavirus. Everyone else in the household must self-isolate for 14 days and follow the same guidance.

You will also need to self-isolate if you have tested positive for coronavirus, or if have been advised to do so by the NHS Test-and-Trace service. If you need to self-isolate, inform your college as soon as you can. This is important for the NHS Test-and-Trace service to be effective, and to help you with continuing your learning at home.

Looking after your wellbeing

It’s completely normal to feel anxious about starting or going back to college, especially this year. If this is affecting you, please talk to friends or trusted adults about it. You can also talk to other young people and wellbeing professionals confidentially about this and anything else troubling you at www.kooth.com. Other resources you may find useful are:

the Mind website (www.mind.org.uk): Provides information about mental health, coping techniques, and support

SHOUT (www.giveusashout.org): A 24/7, confidential and free text line where you can share your worries and access support. The number to text is 85258.

The CYP Haven (www.cyphaven.net): A drop-in service for if you are in a mental health crisis. They also hold a variety of workshops.

Heads Together (http://www.ymcaeastsurrey.org.uk/our-services/youth/heads-together-counselling/): Provides free and confidential counselling in areas of Surrey for anyone aged 14-24.

The Mix (www.themix.org.uk / 08088084994): A support service for under 25s providing counselling, a helpline, and an online community.

Categories
Covid 19 Social

“Keeping in touch with the people that matter is important”.

With the new guidelines of meeting people during lockdown, we understand it may be pretty difficult to get used to this! However, our UVP Apprentice, Amy, shares with you why it is important to keep in contact with your loved one! Read more to find out!

Categories
Covid 19 Mental Health Social

Loneliness

We have been hearing from children and young people that they have been feel lonely during this difficult time. Gina, a UVP Advocate in the team has created some top tips for being alone during self-isolation without feeling lonely. Check it out!

Categories
IT Safety

Online Safety – Myth Busters!

It’s important you make sure that you’re staying safe online. Our UVP Participation Officer, Helen, has crated some myth busters around online safety! See if you can get them right!

Categories
Bullying IT Safety

Reporting Cyber-Bullying

In a recent Instagram poll on @OurVoiceSurrey 76% of young people had been affected by online bullying. 69% of young people who answered our Instagram poll on @OurVoiceSurrey knew how to report online bullying, but if you are unsure how to, read more to find out how! Stay safe!

Categories
Bullying IT Mental Health Safety

CYA: Cyber-bullying and the impact on young people’s mental health.

Cyber-bullying is fast becoming one of the biggest issues for young people. In a recent online Instagram poll on @OurVoiceSurrey, young people told us that 76% had been affected by a type of online bullying, with the majority being victims of bullying on group chats or on social media platforms. Read more to find out inclusive experiences from young people and much more!

Categories
Mental Health

Anxiety

We have been hearing from SEND Youth Advisors that they are feeling anxious during self-isolation and that they would like more resources on anxiety. Do not worry – SABP have made an anxiety leaflet for you about what anxiety is and how you can get support!

Categories
Mental Health Recipes

How to – Strawberry and banana trifle

For this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week theme, why not shower your kindness and make an appetising strawberry and banana trifle for your loved ones! Our User Voice and Participation Advocate, Sania, will show you how! Share your recreations with us, we hope you have fun making it, enjoy!

Categories
Covid 19 Safety

Contacting emergency services during COVID19

We have recently heard from children and young people that they are apprehensive to call emergency services due to the COVID19 outbreak. However, our Apprentice, Amy, from the User Voice and Participation team has created a brilliant blog post on why it is okay to contact emergency services during this pandemic. So, do not worry! Check it out by clicking on the link below. Remember, your health is a priority!

Categories
Mental Health Social

Kooth’s Kindness Challenge for Mental Health Awareness Week

For Mental Health Awareness Week check out Kooth’s 5 Steps to Wellbeing! Kooth also challenges you to the Kooth Kindness challenge!

1) Offer to do the shopping.

2) Pay a few compliments.

3) Smile more often.

4) Express your gratitude.

5) Send a sad friend a funny video.

Click below to see how you can get involved for this week! We’d love to hear your Kindness Challenge!

Categories
Mental Health

Mental Health Awareness Week 2020

Mental Health Awareness Week is the UK’s national week to raise awareness of mental health. Mental health can affect anyone, at any time. This year #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek is all about how much #KindnessMatters


If you would like to get involved with #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek 18th – 24th May 2020 get in contact with us!
We’d love to share your #KindnessMatters content on our social media platforms!

Check out the poster created by the Mental Health Foundation’s for the week!

Categories
Covid 19 Mental Health

Sleep self-care tips

We understand that during this strange time, it is difficult to catch some sleep. Therefore, we created some tips that can help you sleep so you can look after yourself! Let’s talk about good sleep hygiene, we hope this works out for you!

Categories
Safety

Domestic Abuse guidance – where to get help

If you’re worried about abuse, your safety, or the safety of your friends or loved ones, please take a look at the resource and information pack created for young people by the User Voice and Participation team’. Please be aware that this content may be triggering.

Do not feel alone and seek help!

Categories
SEND

Dyslexia

One of our amazing SYAS member’s, Ryan, has created this fantastic blog piece all about dyslexia. It’s definitely worth the read! Click to find out more!

 

Categories
Work

Lost your job or struggling with finances?

Due to the recent COVID19 pandemic, we understand many people are in a vulnerable position who are facing financial struggles. Our User Voice and Participation Team’s Apprentice, Amy has put together advice and useful information if you are in hardships! Read more to find out.

Categories
IT Safety

Staying safe online at home

Staying safe at home is important. If you feel you’re struggling, be sure to reach out to people who can help you! For more safety advice, read more to find out!

Categories
Covid 19 Mental Health

Anger

Have you been feeling angry recently especially since this COVID19 pandemic? Helen, a Participation Officer from the User Voice and Participation team created a post about anger and ways of coping with it!

Categories
Covid 19 The Environment

10 ways to connect with nature without leaving your home this Spring!

Tired of staying at home during quarantine and fear you’re missing out this Spring? Do not worry – find yourself doing different activities and connect with nature this Spring! Spring brings an uplifting and a sense of comfort, so enjoy it while you can!

Categories
Covid 19

Students help isolated people during Covid19 through #Task4Help

Since Universities have closed, students are out to help people in self-isolation using the new initiative #Task4Help launched by UniTaskr app. Through this app, people can task students to collect supplies and deliver in their homes! How thoughtful, right?! Read more to find out how this service has been helping so many vulnerable people!

Categories
Covid 19 Mental Health

Self-care tips during COVID-19

It’s difficult keeping your mental health positive and being distracted from this COVID-19 isolation we are all in. So, one of our amazing CYA Staines member, Tiffany, has kindly shared her experience and thoughts on taking care of your mental health. Thank you, Tiffany! Read more to find out!

Categories
Mental Health

CYA Guildford wellbeing workshop – ‘Flower of positivity’

Yesterday, CYA Guildford took part in a virtual workshop with Gareth from the CYP Haven, and collaboratively created this flower of wellbeing with petals of positivity on Zoom! We hope this flower brightens your day 🙂 Thank you CYA Guildford!

Categories
Mental Health

Every Mind Matters – Tips for you to look after your wellbeing

Mind Matters have put together expert advice and informative tips on how to look after your mental health and wellbeing, and how to actively get support now! Read more to find out!

Categories
Covid 19 News

News: UK coronavirus rules relaxed for people with autism and learning disabilities

The UK government has announced their change in policy for those people that have autism and learning disabilities. Now, there are flexible measures for people with autism and learning disabilities can now exercise more than once a day and travel outside their local area with precaution under lockdown guidelines. How amazing! Check out the link below for more information!

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/14/uk-coronavirus-rules-autism-learning-disabilities-lockdown 

 

Categories
Mental Health

Self-care activities

One of our wonderful CYA Guildford member, Hannah, has created an amazing poster of her tips and ideas of activities you could do for self-care! A big thank you to Hannah. Check it out!

Categories
Mental Health Safety

Kooth are still here for you!

We would like to remind you that Kooth are still available to support your wellbeing! Check out their posters below for more information.

Categories
Covid 19 Education

Covid19 & Exams

Are you feeling uneasy about what’s happening with your GCSE or A-Level exam grades this year? Check out our video on SYAS Facebook or our Instagram IGTV! Dom explains all!

https://www.facebook.com/SurreySYAS

Categories
SEND

Celebrating the achievements of people with Autism!

SYAS would like to share some amazing achievements of famous people who have Autism – check it out!

Categories
Covid 19

Isolation Vlog!

As we come to the end of World Autism Awareness Week, Andrew who is a SYAS member has created a Vlog; A week in the life of Andrew during self-isolation! Make sure to check it out on SYAS Facebook – Add us as a friend on SYA Surrey! Or follow us on Instagram @ourvoicesurrey

https://www.facebook.com/SurreySYAS

Categories
Uncategorized

Positive News

As we near the weekend, we would like to share with you some positive news stories we heard in March 2020! Make sure to check them out!

We would love to hear your positive news, get in touch!

Categories
Uncategorized

World Autism Awareness Week!

We are so proud and privileged to be able to share Emma’s experience with ASD! Emma’s experience highlights Girls with Autism and Wishes for the Future – please take a moment to read and share!

Thank-you Emma!

Categories
Uncategorized

Isolation Tips!

Self-isolating can be really difficult so Georgia in the User Voice and Participation Team has created a guide to self-isolating, including fun activities you can be doing at home! Make sure you check them out!

If you do any of the activities we’d love to hear from you and see what you’ve created!

Categories
Covid 19 Mental Health Safety SEND

Virtual Support!

The User Voice and Participation Team would like to share what virtual Emotional Well-being and Mental Health support is available to you! Accessing virtual support is so important to keep ourselves emotionally and mentally supported especially during self isolation! Make sure to check the services out!

Categories
Covid 19

How To Keep a Structure During Self Isolation

During this unsettling time it can be difficult to keep a structure or routine whist self-isolating. Joe, an apprentice in the User Voice and Participation shares some top tips on what we can be doing during self isolation! Check them out here!

Categories
Covid 19

How to look after your mental health during Coronavirus

We understand that there is panic within our communities due to COVID-19, and we can only do as much as we can to protect ourselves and others around us, physically and mentally. An advocate within our User Voice and Participation team, Sania, created a blog post on top tips to protect your mental health during Coronavirus. Also includes great tips from write Vex King – Author of book ‘Good Vibes, Good Life’!

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Bullying Mental Health

Stop Bullying!

Bullying has a huge effect on young people’s mental health which can result in school refusal, high anxiety, depression, low mood and can also have a detrimental impact on young people’s education. Check out what CYA would like Surrey and schools to do to stop bullying! Remember be kind always!

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Covid 19 Mental Health

What to if you're feeling worried or anxious about Coronavirus.

If you’re worried or anxious about Coronavirus, you are not alone! Amy an apprentice in the User Voice and Participation Team has shared some top tips. Click here to check them out!

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Covid 19 Mental Health

Coping Calendar: Keep Calm, Stay Wise, Be Kind

Action for Happiness has create a Coping Calendar! Click here to check it out – 30 actions to look after ourselves and each other during this difficult time.

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Surveys

Our Voice Matters Survey!

The User Voice and Participation Team would like to know what matters to YOU and to give you a forum to have YOUR voice heard! Make sure you complete our teams Our Voice Survey. You’ll be in with the chance of winning £250 or an iPad!

The OUR Voice Survey for Primary -4-11 years

https://www.surreysays.co.uk/csf/our-voice-matters-survey-primary/

The OUR Voice Survey for Secondary/College – 11/12-25 years

https://www.surreysays.co.uk/csf/our-voice-matters-survey/

Alternatively we have created an Easy Read Version of Our Voice Survey! Click below!

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News SEND

Virtual SYAS

We are proud to announce Virtual SYAS is taking place next week via Facebook Video Chat Friday 27th March! Come and join in!

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Achievement Celebration

YES! Awards 2020

What a wonderful evening we had, celebrating children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities amazing achievements at the YES! Awards 2020! Take a look at an overview of the evening!

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Covid 19

Coronavirus

It can be scary to hear about a disease outbreak, but learning the facts about coronavirus may help ease your mind. Check out Brain Pop video to find out more about how viruses work, and the best ways to prevent them from infecting people.

https://www.brainpop.com/health/diseasesinjuriesandconditions/coronavirus/
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Mental Health Surveys

Mental Heath Awareness 2020

During Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week, we asked CAMHS Youth Advisor Freya a few questions on why mental health awareness is so important. Make sure to check it out – includes top tips for being brave!

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SEND Social Work

Top 10 do’s and don’ts when working with children and young people with SEND

SYAS creates a top 10 do’s and don’ts when working with children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities! Click to check it out!

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News SEND

Surrey County Council’s SEND Partnership Strategy!

Our wonderful SEND Youth Advisors experience features in Surrey County Council’s SEND Partnership Strategy – click to check it out!

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News SEND

SYAS – SEND Youth Advisors Surrey

SYAS is a participation group for children and young people age 10-25 with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) living in Surrey.

There are two SYAS groups across Surrey:

Epsom – runs the 3rd Wednesday of every month
Woking – runs the 1st Thursday of every month

If you would like to be involved make sure to contact us!
Email: User.voice@surreycc.gov.uk
Facebook: SYA Surrey
Twitter & Instagram: @Ourvoicesurrey